New York Natural Heritage Program
Horned Clubtail
Arigomphus cornutus (Tough, 1900)
Insects

General Description [-]
This is a large (5.5 cm) narrow- clubbed species with a greyish green thorax and black shoulder stripes, otherwise little striping on the thorax. The legs all black, eyes brilliant blue. Adbomen is black with pale yellowish to grey dorsal stripe, becoming spear points to rear ending at S8; S8-9 rusty orange.

Characters Most Useful for Identification [-]
The large and broad male claspers are distinctive and often visible in the field with binoculars. Females have "horns" (small protuberances) behind the eyes.

Best Life Stage for Proper Identification [-]
Adult

Behavior [-]
Like other Arigomphus, this wary species often lands on floating plants or on rocks jutting from the water, often just out of reach.

Diet [-]
The larvae are generalist predators, while the adults feed on flying insects.
Horned Clubtail Images
click to enlarge
The Best Time to See
In New York, this species is active and on the wing for about a month, from May 21 to June 21.
J F M A M J J A S O N D
Reproducing Larvae present and active
The time of year you would expect to find Horned Clubtail reproducing (blue shading) and larvae present and active (orange shading) in New York.
Similar Species
  • Unicorn Clubtail (Arigomphus villosipes)
    Males of this species have narrower and paler claspers, and less pale color on the tip of the abdomen. Females are more similar.
  • Lilypad Clubtail (Arigomphus furcifer)
    Males of this species have narrower and paler claspers, and less pale color on the tip of the abdomen. Females are more similar.