New York Natural Heritage Program
Peregrine Falcon
Falco peregrinus Tunstall, 1771
Birds

Habitat [-]
Peregrine Falcons often nest on ledges or holes on the faces of rocky cliffs. They will also nest on manmade structures such as bridges and tall buildings, especially near or in urban areas. Wintering birds frequent buildings, towers, and steeples in urban areas, and open areas with plentiful prey in more natural settings.

Associated Ecological Communities [-]
  • Calcareous cliff community
    A community that occurs on vertical exposures of resistant, calcareous bedrock (such as limestone or dolomite) or consolidated material; these cliffs often include ledges and small areas of talus.
  • Cliff community
    A community that occurs on vertical exposures of resistant, non-calcareous bedrock (such as quartzite, sandstone, or schist) or consolidated material; these cliffs often include ledges and small areas of talus.
  • Red cedar rocky summit
    A community that occurs on warm, dry, rocky ridgetops and summits where the bedrock is calcareous (such as limestone or dolomite, but also marble, amphibolite, and calcsilicate rock), and the soils are more or less calcareous. The vegetation may be sparse or patchy, with numerous lichen covered rock outcrops.
  • Shale cliff and talus community
    A community that occurs on nearly vertical exposures of shale bedrock and includes ledges and small areas of talus. Talus areas are composed of small fragments that are unstable and steeply sloping; the unstable nature of the shale results in uneven slopes and many rock crevices.
  • Urban structure exterior
    The exterior surfaces of metal, wood, or concrete structures (such as commercial buildings, apartment buildings, houses, bridges) or any structural surface composed of inorganic materials (glass, plastics, etc.) in an urban or densely populated suburban area. These sites may be sparsely vegetated with lichens, mosses, and terrestrial algae; occasionally vascular plants may grow in cracks.