New York Natural Heritage Program
Regal Moth
Citheronia regalis (Fabricius, 1793)
Insects

Habitat [-]
This species inhabits deciduous forests in the eastern United States (Hall 2014). Common host plants for larvae that occur in New York are hickories, ash, butternut, sycamore, walnut, persimmon, and sumac (Covell 1984, Beadle and Leckie 2012).

Associated Ecological Communities [-]
  • Appalachian oak-hickory forest*
    A hardwood forest that occurs on well-drained sites, usually on ridgetops, upper slopes, or south- and west-facing slopes. The soils are usually loams or sandy loams. This is a broadly defined forest community with several regional and edaphic variants. The dominant trees include red oak, white oak, and/or black oak. Mixed with the oaks, usually at lower densities, are pignut, shagbark, and/or sweet pignut hickory.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Chestnut oak forest*
    A hardwood forest that occurs on well-drained sites in glaciated portions of the Appalachians, and on the coastal plain. This forest is similar to the Allegheny oak forest; it is distinguished by fewer canopy dominants and a less diverse shrublayer and groundlayer flora. Dominant trees are typically chestnut oak and red oak.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Coastal oak-hickory forest*
    A hardwood forest with oaks and hickories codominant that occurs in dry, well-drained, loamy sand of knolls, upper slopes, or south-facing slopes of glacial moraines of the Atlantic Coastal Plain.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Oak-tulip tree forest*
    A hardwood forest that occurs on moist, well-drained sites in southeastern New York. The dominant trees include a mixture of five or more of the following: red oak, tulip tree, American beech, black birch, red maple, scarlet oak, black oak, and white oak.

    * probable association but not confirmed