New York Natural Heritage Program
Richard's Fungus Moth
Metalectra richardsi Brower, 1941
Insects

Identifying Characteristics [-]
Richard's fungus moth is a small moth with a wingspan of 15-17 mm. It has yellowish wings that are patterned with light and darker brown shading. The hind wings are much paler than the forewings (Covell 1984). For a more detailed description, see Brower (1941). Larvae (caterpillars) of fungus moths (Metalectra species) lack prolegs on abdominal segments A3 and A4; have rough skin; have a white, cream, or tan background; and are often found on bracket fungi and other fungi (Wagner et al. 2008).

Best Life Stage for Proper Identification [-]
The adult is the best life stage for identification.

Behavior [-]
In southern New Jersey, there are two broods each year. Presumably pupae hibernate (NatureServe 2010).

Diet [-]
Larvae of fungus moths (Metalectra species) are believed to feed on fungi, such as bracket fungi, on trees (NatureServe 2010). They seem to prefer bracket fungi and other fungi with long-lasting fruiting bodies (Wagner et al. 2008).
Richard's Fungus Moth Images
click to enlarge
The Best Time to See
The best time to see Richard's fungus moth is during its flight season, from late May-August (Covell 1984). In New York State, adults have been captured in mid-late July. Similarly, from 1931-1941 in Massachusetts, 13 specimens were collected in July (Brower 1941).
J F M A M J J A S O N D
Present Reproducing
The time of year you would expect to find Richard's Fungus Moth present (blue shading) and reproducing (orange shading) in New York.