New York Natural Heritage Program
Jersey Jair Underwing
Catocala jair ssp. 2
Insects

Identifying Characteristics [-]
The Jersey jair underwing is a colorful moth with a wingspan of approximately 35-40 mm. Its forewings contain brown shading between the postmedial and subterminal lines, and its hind wings are yellowish orange, with black only at the border (Covell 1984). The caterpillar is pale gray with uniform gray mottling (Wagner et al. 2008).

Best Life Stage for Proper Identification [-]
The adult is the best life stage for identification.

Behavior [-]
There is one generation each year. Adults lay their eggs in bark crevices or in the leaf litter at the base of the larval foodplant, scrub oak (Quercus ilicifolia). The eggs overwinter. In the spring, larvae (caterpillars) must eat new leaves rather than older, hardened vegetation. The larvae seem to have five instars before pupating and emerging as adults. Adults have a relatively long flight season (Wagner et al. 2008), lasting from early July until early September in New York State.

Diet [-]
In southern New England and New York State, larvae feed on scrub oak (Quercus ilicifolia).
Jersey Jair Underwing Images
click to enlarge
The Best Time to See
The best time to see the Jersey jair underwing is during its flight season. In New York State, it has been captured flying from early July until early September.
J F M A M J J A S O N D
Present Reproducing
The time of year you would expect to find Jersey Jair Underwing present (blue shading) and reproducing (orange shading) in New York.