New York Natural Heritage Program
Bridgham's Brocade
Oligia bridghamii (Grote and Robinson, 1866)
Insects

Habitat [-]
In New York, Bridgham's Brocade moths have been found at the edges of sea level fen and martitime heathland, dunes, and grassland on Long Island. They have also been documented in a sandstone pavement barrens natural community in Clinton county dominated by jack pine and containing shrubs, mosses, lichens, and ferns (New York Natural Heritage Program 2011). Larval foodplant requirements are currently unknown; however, the larvae are believed to be generalists or feed on widely distributed plants (NatureServe 2012).

Associated Ecological Communities [-]
  • Maritime dunes
    A community dominated by grasses and low shrubs that occurs on active and stabilized dunes along the Atlantic coast. The composition and structure of the vegetation is variable depending on stability of the dunes, amounts of sand deposition and erosion, and distance from the ocean.
  • Maritime grassland
    A grassland community that occurs on rolling outwash plains of the glaciated portion of the Atlantic coastal plain, near the ocean and within the influence of offshore winds and salt spray.
  • Maritime heathland
    A dwarf shrubland community that occurs on rolling outwash plains and moraine of the glaciated portion of the Atlantic coastal plain, near the ocean and within the influence of onshore winds and salt spray.
  • Sandstone pavement barrens
    An open canopy woodland that occurs on very shallow soils over sandstone bedrock; this community is best developed where the bedrock is nearly level, thus forming a pavement. The best developed examples are found on Potsdam Sandstone in Clinton County. Large examples often include wetlands, such as perched bogs and inland poor fens.
  • Sea level fen
    A wetland that occurs at the upper edge of salt marshes but is fed primarily by acidic groundwater seeping out along the upland edge. This fresh water sometimes mixes with salt or brackish water during unusually high tides. There is a high abundance of sedges that decompose slowly and create a deep substrate of peat. This peat is underlain by deep sand or gravel. These fens usually have a high diversity of herbs but may also have scattered trees and shrubs.