New York Natural Heritage Program
Subarctic Darner
Aeshna subarctica Walker, 1908
Insects

Habitat [-]
The habitat for this species has been described as muskeg ponds, bogs, and northern swamps (Mead 2003), whereas Nikula et al. (2003) describe the habitat in Massachusetts as sphagnum bogs and deep fens with wet sphagnum. The sole breeding location for this species in New York is a bog complex that includes areas of black spruce-tamarack bog, highbush blueberry bog thicket, and inland poor fen.

Associated Ecological Communities [-]
  • Black spruce-tamarack bog
    A conifer forest that occurs on acidic peatlands in cool, poorly drained depressions. The characteristic trees are black spruce and tamarack; in any one stand, either tree may be dominant, or they may be codominant. Canopy cover is quite variable, ranging from open canopy woodlands with as little as 20% cover of evenly spaced canopy trees to closed canopy forests with 80 to 90% cover.
  • Dwarf shrub bog*
    A wetland usually fed by rainwater or mineral-poor groundwater and dominated by short, evergreen shrubs and peat mosses. The surface of the peatland is usually hummocky, with shrubs more common on the hummocks and peat moss throughout. The water in the bog is usually nutrient-poor and acidic.

    * probable association but not confirmed
  • Highbush blueberry bog thicket
    A wetland usually fed by rainwater or mineral-poor groundwater and dominated by tall shrubs and peat mosses. The most abundant shrub is usually highbush blueberry. The water in the bog is usually nutrient-poor and acidic.
  • Inland poor fen
    A wetland fed by acidic water from springs and seeps. Plant remains in these fens do not decompose rapidly and thus the plants in these fens usually grow on older, undecomposed plant parts of mostly sphagnum mosses.
  • Patterned peatland*
    A large peatland whose surface forms a gentle slope with a mosaic of high and low areas (relative to water levels). These high and low areas occur as narrow or broad bands of vegetation and pools that extend perpendicular to the direction of water flow across the slope of the peatland. Peat moss (Sphagnum) is the most abundant plant.

    * probable association but not confirmed