New York Natural Heritage Program
Ebony Boghaunter
Williamsonia fletcheri Williamson, 1923
Insects

Habitat [-]
The traditional habitat description of this secretive species includes fens and acid bogs with soupy sphagnum pools surrounded by woodlands (Paulson 2011). However in New York, it seems to occupy larger wetland mosaics that can include many different types of wetland microhabitats, from open water with marshy or swampy areas, along with some presence of a fen or bog component; usually there is also running water, such as a small brook. Larvae develop in small, deep, sedge and moss-choked pools.

Associated Ecological Communities [-]
  • Inland poor fen
    A wetland fed by acidic water from springs and seeps. Plant remains in these fens do not decompose rapidly and thus the plants in these fens usually grow on older, undecomposed plant parts of mostly sphagnum mosses.
  • Medium fen
    A wetland fed by water from springs and seeps. These waters are slightly acidic (pH values generally range from 4.5 to 6.5) and contain some dissolved minerals. Plant remains in these fens do not decompose rapidly and thus the plants in these fens usually grow on older, undecomposed plant parts of woody material, grasses, and mosses.

Associated Species [-]
  • Aurora Damsel (Chromagrion conditum)
  • American Emerald (Cordulia shurtleffi)
  • Beaverpond Clubtail (Gomphus borealis)
  • Chalk-Fronted Skimmer (Ladona julia)
  • Hudsonian Whiteface (Leucorrhinia hudsonica)
  • Beaverpond Baskettail (Tetragoneuria canis)