New York Natural Heritage Program
New England Bluet
Enallagma laterale Morse, 1895
Insects

Habitat [-]
The New England bluet inhabits ponds and small lakes with emergent vegetation or boggy edges. On Long Island, as in coastal states such as Massachusetts and Rhode Island, these ponds are typically sandy-bottomed coastal plain ponds (Carpenter 1991, Nikula et al. 2003, Lam 2004, New York Natural Heritage Program 2005). In Rhode Island, Carpenter (1991) has noted a particular association with emergent stands of rushes (Juncus) and pickerelweed. Although the majority of sites occupied by this bluet are in the coastal plain, it is also found at higher elevations away from the coastal plain in Pennsylvania and in the Hudson Highlands region of New York where it is found at ponds bordered by boggy vegetation (New York Natural Heritage Program 2005).

Associated Ecological Communities [-]
  • Bog lake
    The aquatic community of a lake that typically occurs in a small, shallow basin (e.g., a kettehole) that is protected from wind and is poorly drained. These lakes occur in areas with non-calcareous bedrock or glacial till; many are fringed or surrounded by a floating mat of vegetation.
  • Coastal plain pond
    The aquatic community of the permanently flooded portion of a coastal plain pond with seasonally, and annually fluctuating water levels. These are shallow, groundwater-fed ponds that occur in kettle-holes or shallow depressions in the outwash plains south of the terminal moraines of Long Island, and New England. A series of coastal plain ponds are often hydrologically connected, either by groundwater, or sometimes by surface flow in a small coastal plain stream.
  • Coastal plain pond shore
    The gently sloping shore of a coastal plain pond with seasonally and annually fluctuating water levels. Plants growing on the pond shore vary with water levels. In dry years when water levels are low there is often a dense growth of annual sedges, grasses, and herbs. Submerged and floating-leaved aquatic plants, such as fragrant waterlily and pondweeds, may become "stranded" on the exposed shore. In wet years when the water level is high only a few emergents and floating-leaved aquatics may be noticeable. The vegetation of this pond shore community can change dramatically from one year to the next depending on fluctuations in groundwater levels.
  • Coastal plain poor fen
    A wetland on the coastal plain fed by somewhat mineral-rich groundwater and slow decomposition rates of plant materials in the wetland (and thus develops peat). Plants are generally growing in peat composed primarily of Sphagnum mosses with some grass-like and woody components.
  • Dwarf shrub bog
    A wetland usually fed by rainwater or mineral-poor groundwater and dominated by short, evergreen shrubs and peat mosses. The surface of the peatland is usually hummocky, with shrubs more common on the hummocks and peat moss throughout. The water in the bog is usually nutrient-poor and acidic.
  • Eutrophic pond
    The aquatic community of a small, shallow, nutrient-rich pond. The water is usually green with algae, and the bottom is mucky. Eutrophic ponds are too shallow to remain stratified throughout the summer; they are winter-stratified, monomictic ponds.
  • Reservoir/artificial impoundment
    The aquatic community of an artificial lake created by the impoundment of a river with a dam. Reservoirs are constructed to collect water for municipal and/or agricultural water use, to provide hydroelectric power, and to improve opportunities for recreational activities (e.g., boating, swimming), and development.

Associated Species [-]
  • Scarlet Bluet (Enallagma pictum)
  • Pine Barrens Bluet (Enallagma recurvatum)